What Happens When: Deranged DIYs and Humbled How-Tos

dah-di-dah
dah-di-dah what?

Whiskey Hotel Whiskey

You have just downed a bottle of whiskey. You go to hotel, and then you have some more whiskey. These steps, while extremely repeatable, will have drastically different outcomes for each person. One of these outcomes is a Do-It-Yourself disaster. Another is “How to get a hangover… or worse,” depending on what else is brought into the mix.

So, what happens when you follow this recipe?

The culture of the internet world is changing. Creation is shifting to curation. With so much information right at your fingertips, almost anyone can learn how to do almost anything. A quick g00gle search will already tell you how to get 6-pack abs, and build a flame thrower. i.e. You don’t need to re-write that and create more GI. However, what we don’t know, and possibly want to know, is what happens/happened when you got your abs and made a dangerous weapon. This is unique information that only you can produce. Thus, we should continue to create.

DIY ain’t dead. You should absolutely do things yourself for the learning experience. This also does not mean that you should not write How-Tos; there are tonnes of things that we don’t know how to do, or have learned how to do incorrectly.

But, don’t stop there (or do if it has been over done). Teach us about your experience. Tell us What Happens When (WHW).

What? So What? Now What?

Robots are better than I am at my job, or they soon will be. In education, many kids have lost motivation and can’t concentrate. The internet is a better teacher than I am. Children know what they are supposed to learn, and in general they understand why they are supposed to learn it (they just saw it all online yesterday). However, a frequently missed component in education is what we can or should actually do with that knowledge. i.e. What happens when I apply this information?

I was recently taught this process of inquiry:

What: What are you taking about?
So What: Why are you talking about it?
Now What: What do you do about it?

The last piece is really what still makes community and classrooms relevant, but sometimes we forget to teach that. Maybe it’s because of our consumption-only habits. Maybe it’s because someone wants to keep us under control. Maybe it’s because we keep stopping at “maybe,” and only choose to watch from behind the glass.

Technology is here.
It will can help us.
Now what do we do with it?

Caveat Emptor Rex

Steggers
I’m Steggers

“What part of recreating dinosaurs and putting them in a theme park was a good idea?”

Many story premises are ridiculous, but it is undeniable that they are also entertaining. If we wrote a story exclusively about “how to extract dinosaur DNA,” then we might be sorely disappointed; however, we can’t help but wonder WHW we bring dinosaurs back to life and put them in close proximity to people. (SPOILER ALERT: things get eaten).

The Jurassic world in which we live has an appetite of curiosity. In some cases, our brains are still quite primitive. We do a lot of stupid things all the time that slip through the systems unobstructed. So, Mr. Chricton’s premise is actually extremely insightful, and is an extreme example of the primal nature that continues to run the world today. Not to mention, it’s extremely interesting. Extreme!

If you bought into the idea of adding more value to the things that we create, then we must also be aware of the underlying dangers that are already present.

WHW is actually responsible for some of the dino dung that we’re facing today. When we keep feeding our ancient reptilian brains with consumer urges, we just perpetuate the problem. WHW we make it bigger, faster, scarier? (SPOILER ALERT: things get eaten bigger, faster, scarier). Sometimes the consumer doesn’t know what’s best for itself; what it wants (or has been trained to want), isn’t always what it needs.

We need to run the scenarios in our heads first. We need to focus on what benefits the whole rather than what gets me more tokens. We need to then make those things happen.

When we get involved in the outcome, then we can get out of the “safety” of our voyeuristic tendencies that lead to destructive demands and curmudgeonist complaints.

We need a deep sense of community.

OUR Situation

Hello there
Hello there

The Obvious Ubuntu Relevance is right in front of our faces. That circle of friends is severely effected by the action or inaction of each member.

I have bought an Ubuntu device because it’s awesome, but what am I going to do with it?

I have joined an Ubuntu circle because I need community, but what am I going to contribute?

I know how to do these things. But, WHW I actually do something with this knowledge?

It’s cool to sit back and gain confidence—be rational—before producing something in the community, but it’s important that we don’t get stuck at the instructional stage. Furthermore, our contributions need not be that extreme!

Consistent application, experience, and collaboration should lead to progress.

A little less. A little more. (source)
A little less… A little more… (source)

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